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In pictures: Thousands attend women’s marches across US

Morales Divo

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A women demonstrator carries a placard that says, “Smash the Patriarchy”. (AFP) “Vote for your daughter's future,” read one message in the sea of signs carried by demonstrators. “Fight like a girl,” said another

Thousands of protesters marched in Washington and elsewhere in the United States to protest President Donald Trump‘s Supreme Court nominee and to call for his defeat in the November 3 election. Women’s March activists participate in a nationwide protest against US President Donald Trump‘s decision to fill the seat on the Supreme Court left by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 election, in Washington, October 17, 2020. (Reuters) Thousands of mostly young women in masks rallied Saturday in the nation's capital and other US cities, exhorting voters to oppose President Donald Trump and his fellow Republican candidates in the November 3 elections.

The rallies, which organizers said were taking place in all 50 states, were inspired by the first Women's March in Washington, a huge anti-Trump rally held a day after his 2017 inauguration.

But in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, the demonstrations Saturday were considerably smaller.

Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women’s March on October 17, 2020, in New York City. (AFP) Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, opened the event by asking people to keep their distance from one another, saying that the only superspreader event would be the recent one at the White House.

She talked about the power of women to end Trump’s presidency.

“His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” she said.

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A women demonstrator carries a placard that says, “Smash the Patriarchy”. (AFP) “Vote for your daughter's future,” read one message in the sea of signs carried by demonstrators. “Fight like a girl,” said another.

Dozens of other rallies were planned from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to Trump and his policies, especially the push to fill the seat of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day.

One march was held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, outside the dormitory where Bader Ginsburg lived as an undergraduate student.

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Marchers pose with an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential, representing service worker’s demand for respect, full pay and fair elections, is seen at The Women’s March in a Freedom Plaza on October 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. (AFP) In New York, a demonstrator wearing a Donald Trump mask stood next to a statue of George Washington at Federal Hall during the the women's march outside the New York Stock Exchange.

“We Dissent,” said a cardboard sign carried by a young woman wearing a red mask with small portraits of the liberal Supreme Court justice whose Sept. 18 death sparked the rush by Republicans to repl ace her with a conservative.

In Washington, the demonstrators started with a rally at Freedom Plaza, then marched toward Capitol Hill, finishing in front of the Supreme Court, where they were met by a handful of anti-abortion activists.

Protesters demonstrate during a Women’s March advocating for women’s rights on October 17, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (AFP) In one of several speeches at the rally, Sonja Spoo, director of reproductive rights campaigns at Ultraviolet, said she has to chuckle when she hears reporters ask Trump whether he will accept a peaceful transfer of power if he loses his reelection bid.

“When we vote him out, come Nov. 3, there is no choice,” said Spoo. “Donald Trump will not get to choose whether he stays in power.”

“That is not his power, that is our power. … We are the hell and high water,” she said.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies